Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and sores (ulcers) in the lining of the large intestine (colon ). It usually affects the lower section (sigmoid colon) and the rectum. But it can affect the entire colon. In general, the more of the colon that is affected, the worse the symptoms will be.
The disease can affect people of any age. But most people who have it are diagnosed before the age of 30.

Causes Of Ulcerative Colitis?

Experts aren’t sure what causes it. They think it might be caused by the immune system overreacting to normal bacteria in the digestive tract. Or other kinds of bacteria and viruses may cause it.

You are more likely to get ulcerative colitis if other people in your family have it.

Symptoms are:

1. Belly pain or cramps.

2. Diarrhea.

3. Bleeding from the rectum.

4. Some people also may have a fever, may not feel hungry and may lose weight. In severe cases, people may have diarrhea 10 to 20 times a day.

5. The disease can also cause other problems, such as joint pain, eye problems, or liver disease.

pressure_ulcer5In most people, the symptoms come and go. Some people go for months or years without symptoms (remission). Then they will have a flare-up. About 5 to 10 out of 100 people with ulcerative colitis have symptoms all the time.

How Is Ulcerative Colitis Diagnosed?

Doctors ask about the symptoms, do a physical exam, and do a number of tests. Testing can help the doctor rule out other problems that can cause similar symptoms, such as Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and diverticulitis.

How Is It Treated?

Ulcerative colitis affects everyone differently. Your doctor will help you find treatments that reduce your symptoms and help you avoid new flare-ups.

If your symptoms are mild, you may only need to use over-the-counter medicines for diarrhea (such as Imodium). Talk to your doctor before you take these medicines.

Many people need prescription medicines, such as aminosalicylates, steroid medicines, or other medicines that reduce the body’s immune response. These medicines can stop or reduce symptoms and prevent flare-ups.
Talk to your doctor for prescription.