About half of people sending sexts are actually lying, according to a new study.

And if you’re in a committed relationship, the sexts are even more likely to be fabricated than if you’re just having casual sex with your partner,CBS News reported.

In a study of 155 college students, Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne researchers found that 37 per cent of people who had been in a committed relationship and 48 per cent of active sexters had lied about what they were wearing, doing, or both.

As for casual sex partners, only 13 per cent have lied.

Once associated with horny high schoolers — they were even said to use the app SnapChat to send photos instead of just texting — sexting is now common among the larger population.

A McAfee study found that 70 per cent of 18-24-year-olds have “received sexually explicitly texts, videos, or pictures.”

But just because they’re doing it, we can’t assume they like it. In an earlier study, Drouin found that 55 per cent of women and 48 per cent of men have participated in “consensual or unwanted sexting.”

The study explains the reason to do something you don’t like: 67 per cent of the students lied because they wanted to make it better for their partner, while 33 per cent did it for themselves.

She compares it to faking an orgasm in face-to-face sex, adding that people who are insecure in their relationships or hesitant to get attached are more likely to do it.

The results also showed that 45 per cent of the women had lied, compared to 24 per cent of men. This, too, lines up with research on faking an orgasm.

The study is published online in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.